A look at the medicinal uses of cloves

Join us as we take a look at another ingredient commonly used as an herbal supplement: Clove Tree. Used topically, in aromatherapy and as a culinary spice, in the following article, we take a look at the medicinal uses of cloves. With this Blog Post, you will be ready to make your own Clove Capsules with Capsuline's Empty Capsules!

 

Getting botanical

The Clove Tree is an evergreen whose aromatic flower buds, or cloves, are of popular use throughout many aspects of daily life, like cooking and alternative medicine. It is also a popular ingredient in the manufacturing of several household and personal care products like soaps, toothpastes, perfumes and cosmetics. Native to Indonesia, the evergreen trees are now commonly harvested in other tropical climate areas around the world. The botanical name for the Clove Tree is Syzygium aromaticum, and it is part of the Myrtaceae family.

 

Active Ingredients and Substances

The main active ingredients active in cloves are essential oils like acetyl eugenol, beta-caryophyllene, and vanillin; tannins like methyl salicylate; flavonoid such as eugenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, and eugenitin; triterpenoids like oleanolic acid, stigmasterol, and campesterol, as well as several sesquiterpenes. The aroma comes from eugenol, an essential oil, and one of the main active components.

 

Medicinal uses of cloves

Like many herbs and spices (take a look at others we have explored in this blog before), cloves are a rich source of antioxidants. They have also been found to contain other nutrients like vitamins, minerals and fiber. Because of this, they are used as alternative therapy for common ailments. Uses of cloves include:

  • Oral health: Cloves are also antimicrobial and antibacterial which means they are of great use in fighting gingivitis, tooth pain and even bad breath.
  • Digestive health: Cloves have been found to be beneficial to overall digestive health, including specific issues like relieving hiccups, nausea, diarrhea, liver health, reducing cramps and flatulence. They have also been found to favor nutrient absorption.
  • Topical use: Cloves are used as repellent for mosquitoes, as disinfectants for cuts and wounds and clove oil is an analgesic used for pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis. Other folk uses include topical use for premature ejaculation.

 

Associated with many potential health benefits, cloves are an important ingredient to consider for your supplements. Chances are, you already use cloves daily through manufactured products or even in your diet. Why not go the extra step and harness all its benefits and include them as part of your supplement intake? There are certainly plenty of uses!

 

Do you use cloves already? Have you been considering it as an ingredient for the supplements you make? Let us know how you use cloves and we’ll share with the Capsuline Community.

 

This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment.

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