All you need to know about Ginger

As we continue exploring raw ingredients and the benefits of natural medicine, this week we are taking a look at Ginger. A flowering plant native to Asia, ginger has a rich history for its use in folk medicine and as a spice. It is thought to have come to Europe through the spice trade, where other spices like cinnamon, pepper, cardamom and turmeric, first made their way from East to West. With continued relevance in present day. Take a look at our Empty Capsules and start making your own Ginger Supplements using the Capsule Filling Tray by Capsuline.

 

About the plant

The botanical name for ginger is Zingiber officinale. It is part of the Zingiberaceae family, which also includes turmeric (Curcuma longa) and cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum). While it is a flowering plant, the rhizome or ginger root is what it is cultivated for. The root has been found to be a rich fountain of nutrients like Gingerol, its main active compound and a source of antioxidants.

 

Medicinal properties

Using ginger for its medicinal properties has been going on for centuries in Asia and later as it gained popularity towards the west, in Ancient Greece and Roman times. Today, taking ginger as a supplement continues to be common practice. Why? Let’s review some of its better-known benefits:

 

  • Digestive health: Ginger is widely used to treat nausea and vomit associated with morning sickness, chemotherapy, motion sickness, post-surgery, among others. Furthermore, it is also used to aid in chronic indigestion.
  • Lower cholesterol: Ginger has been found to aid in reducing cholesterol, helping to reduce markers for LDL and triglycerides.
  • Regulating blood sugar levels: One of the most “recent” uses of ginger has been for its anti-diabetic benefits. This, of course permeates to other health benefits like diabetics-related heart conditions.
  • Pain relief: Because of its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, Ginger is used in pain relief from migraines to muscle pain, menstrual cramps and osteoarthritis.

 

Precautions and final word on Ginger

As with any ingredient, at Capsuline we recommend talking out potential interactions of Ginger with your physician. As a raw ingredient it is thought to be generally safe, however, always take special considerations if dealing with chronic diseases or special conditions.

 

Because every person has different needs and interacts with different environments, we think that making your own supplements is a great way to cater to your needs. If some the issues and conditions we mentioned before ring a bell with you, we recommend taking a look at Ginger as part of your natural supplement plan. With our quality capsules, you’ll be on your way!

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